MAYFAIR HISTORY

A Vision Realised

The history of Grosvenor’s Mayfair dates back as far as 1677, when Sir
Thomas Grosvenor married Mary Davies, heiress to part of the Manor
of Ebury, on which the modern Mayfair is situated.
Sir Richard Grosvenor began to develop this land. His vision was for a lively, cosmopolitan place of residence and commerce.
Some 40 years later, their resourceful son Sir Richard Grosvenor began to develop this land. His vision was for a lively, cosmopolitan place of residence and commerce, and the following centuries, would see this vision expertly realised.

Mayfair takes its name from the annual May Fayre, held until the 19th century. It was during the last quarter of that century that Hugh Lupus Grosvenor, the first duke of Westminster, took on his father Richard’s vision, injecting fresh energy into redevelopment plans and commissioning a flurry of building in his favourite Queen Anne revival style. Many of Mayfair’s streets – with their happily homogeneous, red-brick town houses – reflect the taste and dedication of the first duke, one of English architecture’s great private patrons, but terracotta Mount Street was his greatest achievement.

Mount Street’s name comes from Mount Field, which included Oliver’s Mount, the remains of fortifications erected during the English civil war. The original street had been built in the 1700s, but in the late 1800s, with many leases approaching expiry, the first duke commandeered his splendid reconstruction. This desire to improve has lasted until the present day, and new Mayfair is ever-evolving. There’s no doubt that the Mayfair of today would have made Sir Thomas and his wife, Mary, proud.